+EMERGENCY & AFTER HOURS
(727) 786-5755

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Hours of Operation

Monday-Friday: 5:30PM-7:00AM
Weekend: Saturday Noon -
     7:00AM Monday morning
Holidays:
Open 24 hours

Call Animal Emergency Veterinary Hospital now for immediate service

Pet Emergency: What to Do

  1. Stay Calm
  2. Call (727) 786-5755
  3. Be prepared with info:
    • Type/Breed
    • Details of problem
    • Any changes
  4. Be aware. Pets may bite if ill or injured.

Location

30610 US Highway 19 N,
Palm Harbor, FL 34684

One block north of Curlew Road on the west side Please call ahead for advice and so we can prepare your arrival.

Directions to
Veterinary Clinic

Click for larger map & directions
Map to Our Veterinary Clinic

Feline Urinary Obstruction

Urinary obstruction in cats can be a serious situation that demands immediate attention. If your cat has a complete blockage this can become a life or death situation.

Very few cat owners know that urinary or urethral obstruction is not uncommon, especially in male cats. The urethra of a male cat is a long thin tube as opposed to the shorter, wider tube of a female cat. This leaves it prone to blockages.

Blockages are usually crystals that have built up in the urine, bladder stones or mucus plugs that are lodged and blocking the flow of urine through the urethra.
If your cat has a blockage, its extremely important that it be removed immediately. Failure to remove a blockage can result in permanent kidney damage or even death.

How can you tell if your cat has a urethral blockage? You know your cat better than anyone else does. Personality changes are one symptom you can look for. If your cat is showing signs of lethargy, or lack of interest in eating or socializing, this is your first clue that something might be up.

If your cat has a blockage, he may become aggressive when held because of the intense pain he's probably experiencing in his abdomen. You might notice him laying around more, looking listless, and meowing in pain.

Check to see if your cat has urinated in his cat box. If there is no urine in the box, your cat is going back to the box frequently, or appears to be straining or crying out in pain when he is trying to urinate, he probably has a blockage.

The quicker you are able to assess your cat and get him to a veterinarian, the better. Time is essential in this case. A urethral blockage is very treatable if your cat is seen soon after symptoms present themselves.

Your veterinarian will quickly be able to tell if a blockage is present by feeling for hardness in the abdomen. If your cat does have a blockage, he will likely need to stay in the hospital overnight for a day or two. In the case of an emergency, Animal Emergency + Urgent Care will work together with you and your veterinarian to get your cat back to his healthy old self.